EQUINE RAILWAY ACCESS
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OLD RAILWAYS ON HORSEBACK

Glen Ogle Trail

In 1842 The Queen made her initial visit to the Highlands in Scotland with Prince Albert. She travelled to Taymouth Castle by boat and from then along Loch Tay to Auchmore, a trip of 14 miles. Following that she went overland to Killin, Glen Ogle, Lochearnhead, St Fillans and Crief to Drummond Castle, a further 30 miles. She would have benefited if the Scottish Central Railway and Calledonian Railway had been conceived as an Act in Parliament in 1845 and built! The line was begun as 10 miles from Doune and Dunblane along the River Teith and opened in 1858. The Killin section in 1886. Too late for her Majesty! The section extended to Tyndrum via Killin passing Lochearnhead (now the Glen Ogle trail) and opened in 1873. The last train was planned for September 1965, but there was a substantial rock fall in Glen Ogle which was too expensive to remove so the line was closed at that point. *Follow the Rob Roy Way Sustrans 7 northwards, towards Killin, on the Old Military Road from the Glen Ogle Cottages to get to the final railway line into the village.*
Note: Grid Ref : NN 5800 2300 This is Sustrans 7 and should, being in Scotland, be an open access path to all users, but we have found two photos of the same gate on the trail. It looks like it was accessible to equines when the photos were snapped. If you ride this route please let us know if you can pass through and we will update this page.
Grid Ref: NN 583 223 From Endchip south of Lochearnhead on the A84. Parking in Lochearnhead Grid Ref: NN 562 339 Killin. Parking
Note: Grid Ref : NN 5800 2300 This is Sustrans 7 and should, being in Scotland, be an open access path to all users, but we have found two photos of the same gate on the trail. It looks like it was accessible to equines when the photos were snapped. If you ride this route please let us know if you can pass through and we will update this page.
© Copyright Gordon Brown and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
Glen Ogle Line © Copyright Jim Barton and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
Glen Ogle Line © Copyright Rob Burke and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
© Copyright Anthony O'Neil and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem
EQUINE RAILWAY ACCESS

Glen Ogle Trail

In 1842 The Queen made her initial visit to the Highlands in Scotland with Prince Albert. She travelled to Taymouth Castle by boat and from then along Loch Tay to Auchmore, a trip of 14 miles. Following that she went overland to Killin, Glen Ogle , Lochearnhead, St Fillans and Crief to Drummond Castle, a further 30 miles. She would have benefited if the Scottish Central Railway and Calledonian Railway had been conceived as an Act in Parliament in 1885 and built! The line was begun as 10 miles from Doune and Dunblane along the River Teith and opened in 1858. The Killin section in 1886. Too late for her Majesty! The section extended to Tyndrum via Killin passing Lochearnhead (now the Glen Ogle trail) and opened in 1873. The last train was planned for September 1965, but there was a substantial rock fall in Glen Ogle which was too expensive to remove before it took place so the line was closed before it took place. *Follow the Rob Roy Way Sustrans 7 northwards, towards Killin, on the Old Military Road from the Glen Ogle Cottages to get to the final railway line into the village.
Note: Grid Ref : NN 5800 2300 This is Sustrans 7 and should, being in Scotland, be an open access path to all users, but we have found two photos of the same gate on the trail. It looks like it was accessible to equines when the photos were snapped. If you ride this route please let us know if you can pass through and we will update this page.
Grid Ref: NN 583 223 From Endchip south of Lochearnhead on the A84. Parking in Lochearnhead Grid Ref: NN 562 339 Killin. Parking
© Copyright Gordon Brown and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
Glen Ogle Line © Copyright Jim Barton and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
© Copyright Anthony O'Neil and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
Glen Ogle Line © Copyright Rob Burke and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.